Community

As many of you know, I spend a good amount of time each summer at Bearskin Meadow Camp, in Kings Canyon/Sequoia National Park. Its beautiful up in the mountains, and a tremendous amount of fun. The camp is for children and families who live with type 1 diabetes. My first summer there was over 20 years ago. 

There are many amazing things about camp, but one of the things that I took away most strongly from this summer is the community that camp offers. People living with diabetes often feel tremendously isolated. Many of the campers and staff that come to camp feel that most of the year, no one “gets it.” In contrast, while they are at camp, everyone “gets it.” There are a whole host of issues that living with diabetes comes with, and spending time with people who have shared those experiences, is profoundly healing. Why? I think, because it dispels the notion of “I am alone.” 

I like to say that the antidote for isolation is community. 

The challenge is that the feelings of isolation that go with living with a chronic illness are not isolated to diabetes. In fact, many of the patients I see daily struggle with this feeling. The irony is that this difficulty connecting with others is universal human experience. Everyone feels it, to a greater or lessor extent. 

So, for people who are lucky enough to be able to go to camp, come to Bearskin. But, everyone and anyone can practice creating community. If you are feeling nervous about striking a conversation with someone— a neighbor, a friend, someone in the checkout line— know that they are probably just as nervous as you are. And know that both of you will be richer, less lonely, and less isolated, with a bit more human connection. Whether at camp or at home, practice building community.